Forest Gallery

Forest Gallery

Established in 1980, Forest Gallery enjoys an excellent reputation as one of the best galleries in the South-East.

Specialising in original paintings in both traditional and contemporary styles, Forest Gallery aims to find a wide variety of artwork from the UK and abroad. Originally situated in Dorking before establishing itself in Guildford for almost 30 years, the gallery is now located in the picturesque town of Petworth, West Sussex on the famous Lombard Street.

 

Art & Architecture walk around Petworth Park and House

Distance 4 miles (6.4km)
Classification Easy
Duration 2 hours
Begins Petworth Park car park
OS grid reference SU966238

Walk in a nutshell
A tour round a Capability Brown landscaped park, which contains one of England's largest herds of fallow deer. Petworth is especially famous as the subject of many Turner paintings, some of which can be viewed inside the house. The terrain is steep in places and can be muddy. You are welcome to bring dogs but do keep them under close control. In the summer you'll also need to prevent them from swimming in the ponds, which contain blue-green algae.

Why it's special
This is a wonderful combination for art and nature lovers. The walk starts amid the landscape and woodland that Turner made famous then, about halfway around the circuit, you reach the magnificence of Petworth House, where 20 of Turner's paintings are on display as part of a dazzling collection that also includes works by Van Dyck and William Blake, carvings by Grinling Gibbons and statuary by John Flaxman and John Edward Carew.

Capability Brown's Pleasure Grounds

The Pleasure Grounds at Petworth were laid out in the 16th century and re-developed by Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown in the latter half of the 18th century. He suggested sites for the Doric Temple and Ionic otunda to give impressive views both to and from the structures, introduced a ha-ha between the Pleasure Grounds and in the Park designed sinuous paths from the mansion and around the grounds.

Cowdray Park

HISTORIC COWDRAY

Cowdray is a Historic Tudor House in Midhurst, West Sussex and one of England’s most important early Tudor houses.

This visitor attraction, visited by Queen Elizabeth I and King Henry VIII, was partially destroyed by fire in 1793. Its magnificent ruins are set in the stunning landscape of Cowdray Park, in the heart of the South Downs National Park.

Cowdray plays host to special events throughout the season, including outdoor theatre and period re-enactments. The Cowdray audio tour is recommended for visitors and we also have a popular special children’s version of the audio tour.

COWDRAY PARK POLO CLUB

With a long and illustrious history, Cowdray Park is recognised as the Home of British Polo.

Viscount Cowdray’s 16,500 acre estate is situated in the South Downs National Park of West Sussex and the game of polo has been played on the estate for 100 years, with the first competitive tournaments being recorded in 1910. Today approximately 450 matches are played each season, with the highlight being the Jaeger-LeCoultre Gold Cup for the British Open Championships and we welcome spectators throughout the season.

GOLF AT COWDRAY

Golf has been played on the scenic Cowdray Park Golf Club course for well over a century. Its combination of sandy soil with the latest in irrigation and sprinkler systems, means superb conditions can be maintained even in wet weather. Cowdray Park Golf Club celebrated its 100th birthday in 2004. The club is a proprietory business, owned by the Viscount Cowdray, and its core aim is to combine excellent facilities with friendly service and a warm welcome to all.

Goodwood Festival of Speed

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An intoxicating mix of cars, stars and motorsport royalty come together over four superb days for the Festival of Speed. The largest event of its kind in the world, the Festival gathers together the planet’s rarest and most glamorous cars.

In the summer of 1936, Freddie March - the 9th Duke of Richmond - hosted a private hillclimb for the Lancia Car Club in the grounds of Goodwood House. In 1993, his grandson, the present Earl of March hosted his own Hillclimb and created the Festival of Speed. The weekend sees an array of Formula 1, supercars, bikes and heritage cars taking on the 1.16 mile Hillclimb, which challenges the world's greatest drivers and riders, including today's Formula 1 and Moto GP stars.

Goodwood Race Course

Goodwood has played host to the Sport of Kings for over 200 years. From its tentative launch as a flat horseracing course for local officers by the third Duke of Richmond in 1802, to its colourful programme of events, fixtures, weddings and entertaining, Goodwood is one of Britain’s great estates and historic homes. The current Duke of Richmond, who trained as an accountant, and his son, Lord March, ensure that the Goodwood Estate is enjoyed by a wide range of visitors and maximises its fullest potential – while retaining its essentially English charm. The Goodwood racecourse is undoubtedly the jewel in the family’s crown.

See our events calendar for up-to-date racing fixtures at Goodwood ››

Goodwood Revival

Those halcyon days

The romance and glamour of motor racing as it used to be. The Revival is the only historic race meeting to be staged entirely in period dress and is a return to the halcyon days of Goodwood as the spiritual home of British motor racing.

It’s an unabashed celebration of flat-out wheel-to-wheel racing, around the sweeps and curves of this classic circuit, which remains unchanged since its heyday. The inaugural Revival opened on 18 September 998, when the Earl of March drove around the circuit in the Bristol 400 in which his grandfather, the 9th Duke of Richmond, opened the track 50 years before. It’s now the world’s most celebrated historic motor racing event, with race fans soaking up the unique atmosphere in period costume.

 
 

Goodwood Motor Circuit

The West Sussex-based Goodwood Motor Circuit originally opened its gates to the public on September 1948 to host Britain’s very first post-war motor race meeting at a permanent venue.

Twelve years earlier, Goodwood’s very first motor sport event was staged when a hill climb meeting was held for a small group of pre-war Lancia enthusiasts, hosted by the 9th Duke of Richmond, Freddie March.

The origins of the Goodwood track derive from an ex-military airfield. RAF Westhampnett, named after the village bordering Goodwood, served as a Battle of Britain base during the War and was the station from which RAF legend Sir Douglas Bader flew his last sortie.

On 18 September 1998, exactly 50 years to the day since the Goodwood circuit first opened, the 9th Duke’s grandson, the present Earl of March, re-enacted the opening of the track at the very first Goodwood Revival meeting in the same Bristol 400 that his grandfather had used half a century earlier on the same track, untouched by the modern world.

Prior to the first Revival meeting in 1998, the circuit was painstakingly restored to look exactly as it did in its heyday, down to the very last detail. Goodwood’s other famous motor sport event, the Goodwood Festival of Speed, was established in 1993 and has gone on to become the world’s largest celebration of motoring culture. Staged in summer in the grounds of Goodwood Park, the Festival attracts the best drivers and vehicles on the planet, including most of the current Formula 1 teams, plus Le Mans winners, racing motorcycles, supercars, and much more besides.